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dc.contributor.advisorSerrano, David
dc.contributor.authorCandelario, Sergio
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-20T17:21:33Z
dc.date.available2018-09-20T17:21:33Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11801/949
dc.description.abstractThis work describes the implementation of the Extended Finite Element Method (a partition of unity finite element method) for the study of fatigue failure of adhesive bonded joints when subjected to variable loading. The main advantage of the Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) is the independence of the finite element mesh to describe the delamination hence, it eliminates the need of re-meshing when the delamination front is propagated. This advantage is particularly useful when modeling delamination under fatigue as no remeshing is needed for each loading cycle. Also in this work, the Extended Finite Element Method is extended to include incompatible elements, with the addition of internal degrees of freedom that allow nonlinear mathematical distortion of a four node bilinear element. These elements are used to model a composite double cantilever beams to study fatigue delamination due to fatigue under random loading. The Yang- Manning’s stochastic model for fatigue delamination was modified and good agreement with experimental data was observed.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectStochastic fatigueen_US
dc.subjectExtended Finite Element Methoden_US
dc.subject.lcshFinite element methoden_US
dc.subject.lcshAdhesive joints--Fatigueen_US
dc.subject.lcshStochastic analysisen_US
dc.titleStochastic fatigue failure prediction of adhesive bonded jointsen_US
dc.rights.licenseAll rights reserveden_US
dc.rights.holder(c) 2017 Sergio Candelarioen_US
dc.contributor.committeeValentín, Ricky
dc.contributor.committeeSundaram, Paul
dc.contributor.representativeSeijo, Roberto
thesis.degree.levelM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.type.thesisThesisen_US
dc.contributor.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.graduationSemesterSpringen_US
dc.description.graduationYear2017en_US


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